• ocean 7 marine

    we build for you to perform

    published: 11 Mar 2007
  • 7 Things We Don't Know About the Ocean

    The ocean covers 70% of the planet, but humans still don’t know very much about it. In this episode, Hank discusses seven mysterious ocean topics. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Linnea Boyev, Tomasz Jonarski, Chris Peters, Philippe von Bergen, Will and Sonja Marple, and Mark Terrio-Cameron. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scisho...

    published: 03 Apr 2016
  • 30 Days Timelapse at Sea | 4K | Through Thunderstorms, Torrential Rain & Busy Traffic

    30 Days of Timelapse, about 80,000 photos combined. 1500GB of Project files. Sailing in the open ocean is a unique feeling and experience.I hope to capture and share it for everyone to see. Route was from Red Sea -- Gulf of Aden -- Indian Ocean -- Colombo -- Malacca Strait -- Singapore -- South East China Sea -- Hong Kong Follow my adventures! Instagram: http://instagram.com/Jeffrey.hk Music: Philip G Anderson - Winter (from 0:00 to 4:37 and 8:00 to 10:00) Buy Winter here: https://philipganderson.bandcamp.com/album/winter Stellardrone - Billions And Billions (from 4:37 to 8:00) Camera used: D750, Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 0:32 Milky Way 0:53 Sirius Star (I think) Correction: Jupiter the planet according to some viewers 1:17 Approaching Port of Colombo 1:45 Cargo Operation 2:08 Departure C...

    published: 10 Sep 2017
  • A day as a marine biologist PhD student #7 | LAB work and end of the week friends time

    I am a marine biology PhD student. More specifically, I am studying marine pollution in the ocean, and even more specifically I am studying how bacteria interact with plastic pollution in the ocean. Here is how a day in my life looks like. The 7th and the last day of my one week vlog!! ############################################### YOU CAN ALSO FOLLOW ME HERE: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/maria.seandme/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mcMariaSea Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/seandmebyM/

    published: 07 May 2017
  • Warming oceans and marine species migration: poleward bound

    The fallout from climate change is often framed as a terrestrial problem, yet global warming is having profound effects on marine life. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6

    published: 11 Dec 2015
  • Overview | Exploring Oceans

    The ocean produces 70 percent of the Earth's oxygen and drives our weather and the chemistry of the planet. Most of the creatures on Earth live in the sea. But our knowledge of the ocean is far outstripped by our impact on it. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Overview | Exploring Oceans https://youtu.be/3GR...

    published: 16 Mar 2009
  • BLACK DRAGON - Fine Ocean Marine asphalt/bitumen tanker

    The FINE OCEAN MARINE asphalt/bitumen tanker BLACK DRAGON sailed the Kanmon Strait to Ulsan. BLACK DRAGON MMSI: 373901000 IMO: 9652301 Callsign: 3FBS2 Type: ASPHALT/BITUMEN TANKER Size: 80m X 14m GT: 2,106 tons DWT: 2,329 tons Built: 2012 Yard: KURINOURA DOCKYARD & SHIPBUILDING Flag: Panama Fimed date: 2016/02/25 Camera: Panasonic HC-V210M Thanks for watching. Feel free to click like and subscribe. I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (https://www.youtube.com/editor)

    published: 06 Mar 2016
  • Learning with Toys Ep08 Marine Animals in Ocean world (Number & Size Play)

    How many Marine Animals in Ocean World!? Let's counting together! Variety of marine animals are here! Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE!!!

    published: 03 Jul 2017
  • Seven Marine 557 Speed Runs

    West Coast Editor Jim Hendricks tests the acceleration and speed of a Midnight Express 39 Open powered by triple Seven Marine 557 outboards.

    published: 01 May 2013
  • Microfibers Polluting the Ocean and Marine Life

    Tiny plastic fibers from your favorite clothing may be contaminating oceans and marine life. For more Channel One News updates subscribe to Channel One News: https://www.youtube.com/user/ChannelOneNews Visit the Channel One News Website: http://www.channelone.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChannelOneNews/ Twitter: @ChannelOneNews Instagram: @channelonenews Channel One News is the leading news program for young people across the country. Now in its 27th season, the dynamic, daily news show covers domestic and international news stories from a relevant young person’s perspective. Teachers: For daily, supplementary curriculum content tied to each day’s show and access to our video library of more than 2,200 videos, head over to http://www.channelone.com/subscribe/.

    published: 28 Mar 2017
  • Episode 7: Recreational Diving and Ocean Conservation, Nov. 20, 2014

    You do not have to be a marine scientist to help conserve the oceans. Recreational divers can help protect underwater resources, too. In this episode, diving experts share how recreational divers can contribute to ocean conservation, and they discuss how anyone, in any state, can become certified divers through the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI), which sponsored the episode. The episode features Lisa Rollins from popular The Weather Channel show “Catching Hell,” Sarah Egner, assistant director of MarineLab (www.marinelab.org), and an interview with Amy Slate, owner of Amoray Dive Resort (www.amoray.com).

    published: 20 Nov 2014
  • Episode 7: Green Marine | Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15

    Rick concludes his European road-trip at Green Marine in Southampton, England. We're given a privileged sneak peek at the full-scale wooden mock-up of the Volvo Ocean 65 which has been built there, in preparation for putting together the real thing for the 2014-15 race. Expect more like this to be uploaded to the Official Volvo Ocean Race YouTube Channel in the future. Get all the latest updates on www.VolvoOceanRace.com

    published: 15 Feb 2013
  • Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

    Check out these top unexplained mysteries of the deep ocean. From strange sounds captured in the deep sea by hydrophones such as the bloop, the train, and julia, to gigantic whirlpools, biggest underwater falls and the milky bioluminescent sea phenomenon. Are deep sea monsters living deep in the ocean? Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "12 Historical Treasures In The Middle East DESTROYED!" video here: https://youtu.be/Nt9mWUpTp1U Watch our "Most HAUNTED Places In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/h9elrDhft9w Watch our "Most DANGEROUS Religious Cults Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/VTD1qabI3v0 9. Underwater Falls Voted one of the most beautiful places on Earth, Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. On the Southwestern tip of the island you...

    published: 05 Sep 2016
  • What is MARINE GEOLOGY? What does MARINE GEOLOGY mean? MARINE GEOLOGY meaning & explanation

    What is MARINE GEOLOGY? What does MARINE GEOLOGY mean? MARINE GEOLOGY meaning - MARINE GEOLOGY definition - MARINE GEOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Marine geology or geological oceanography is the study of the history and structure of the ocean floor. It involves geophysical, geochemical, sedimentological and paleontological investigations of the ocean floor and coastal zone. Marine geology has strong ties to physical oceanography. Marine geological studies were of extreme importance in providing the critical evidence for sea floor spreading and plate tectonics in the years following World War II. The deep ocean floor is the last essentially unexplored frontier and detailed mapping in support of bo...

    published: 03 Jan 2017
  • Marine Debris & Ocean Currents

    Click here to subscribe ► http://bit.ly/2dPZNN2 Cool: Ocean currents Not Cool: Trash swirling around in ocean currents Many people don't realize that ocean currents not only transport fish, nutrients, heat and other important natural phenomena around the planet, but they also circulate our trash! Yep, that water bottle that fell out of your boat when you capsized could be halfway to Tahiti by now! Understanding how currents work, including how to measure them using drifters, allows scientists to better predict ocean circulation. Here we outline a simple experiment you can do to measure the currents at your home. To learn more about US Sailing's Reach Initiative, STEM & environmental education through sailing, check out reach.ussailing.org

    published: 31 Aug 2017
  • marine zone in hong kong ocean park part 7

    marine zone in hong kong ocean park part 7

    published: 05 Aug 2011
  • Amazing Underwater Marine Life

    Amazing Underwater Marine Life Enjoy this relaxing underwater video from the philippines. Most of the time the ocean appears to be blue because this is the color our eyes see. But the ocean can be many other colors depending upon particles in the water, the depth of the water, and the amount of skylight. The colors we see depend upon the reflection of the visible wavelengths of light to our eyes. Wavelengths of light pass through matter differently depending on the material's composition. Blue wavelengths are transmitted to greater depths of the ocean, while red wavelengths are absorbed quickly. Water molecules scatter blue wavelengths by absorbing the light waves, and then rapidly reemitting the light waves in different directions. That is why there are mostly blue wavelengths that are re...

    published: 06 Feb 2014
  • Top 10 CREEPY DEEP SEA Creatures Recently Discovered

    Welcome to Top10Archive! The deep blue sea… Often said to be Earth’s last great frontier, an estimated 85% of the world’s ocean remains undiscovered. That of course means we’re bound to stumble upon new species and incredible discoveries. These 10 findings of the past two years are just a small sampling of what’s really out there, waiting our prying eyes and acquiring minds. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Unknown Sea Cucumber 9. New Species of Ctenophore 8. Sunburst 7. Narrow-head Catshark 6. Dusky Snout Catshark 5. Mariana Trench Jellyfish 4. Hunchback Anglerfish 3. Ninja Lanternshark 2. Xenoturbella churro 1. Ghost Octopus Voice Over Talent: https://www.youtube.com/user/thought2

    published: 23 May 2016
  • Ocean's Alive Marine Phytoplankton For EPA & DHA

    Yep! It's impossible to find Ocean’s Alive Marine Phytoplankton at this pricing these days! It's estimated that 90% of Americans are deficient in Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and what's alarming about this is that 60% of the human brain is made up of these valuable fatty esters. I was listening to Dr. Jack Kruse, an expert on Omega fats and he stated that to really absorb any significant amount of EPA and DHA from a food, it must come from a "live" source or it quickly becomes rancid and is not readily absorbable. This is one of the reasons he frowns upon a vegan diet and is a huge advocate of eating specific fish and other sea animals, which contain EPA and DHA. However, for the Ocean's Alive Marine Phytoplankton, they take freshly harvested, raw marine phytoplankton from contained labs in Spain ...

    published: 01 Feb 2016
  • Predator X - Most powerful marine reptile ever - Planet Dinosaur - BBC

    In 2006, a fossil was dug out of a frozen island high in the Arctic. It was a colossal marine reptile, twice as big as most ocean predators, at 15 metres long and weighing about 45 tonnes. This was Predator X, the most powerful marine reptile ever discovered. Its skull alone was nearly twice the size of a tyrannosaurus rex's, and its bite force unmatched by anything in the Jurassic seas. Narrated by John Hurt Planet Dinosaur tells the stories of the biggest, deadliest and weirdest creatures ever to walk the Earth, using the latest fossil evidence and immersive computer graphics. Subscribe to BBC Earth: http://bit.ly/ydxvrP Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth (ex-UK only) BBC Earth Twitter h...

    published: 21 Jun 2013
  • 14 Ocean's Deadliest Creatures

    Here are the top 14 dangerous and some even poisonous creatures in the ocean it's terrifying to think they are under there waiting!! 7. Megalodon Megalodon is an extinct species of shark that lived millions of years ago. They were a lot like the great white sharks of today only much bigger. While great whites can reach a length of 20 feet, Megalodon’s could reportedly reach a ridiculous length of nearly 60 feet. Their teeth have been found across the globe from Australia to Japan and as far north as England and Denmark. 6. Killer Whales Being an apex predator means you have no natural predators. Essentially these are the animals at the top of the food chain. Killer, or Orca, whales are considered apex predators and have been known to kill great white sharks, leopard seals, and even ot...

    published: 05 Oct 2016
  • 7 of the Smartest Sea Creatures

    7 of the Smartest Sea Creatures! There are a lot intelligent animals in the ocean. But here are the most genius ones, like the dolphin or octopus. Subscribe for the latest videos: https://goo.gl/7xzjzR 7: Whales Sperm whales, which are the largest of the toothed-whale species, have the largest brains in the animal kingdom, weighing, on average, 17 pounds. Although the mere size of the brain is not necessarily an indication of intelligence, scientists have discovered that sperm whales, such as the humpback whale or beluga whales, have spindle cells in their brains. These cells are only found in species believed to have higher intelligence, such as elephants, great apes, & humans. Scientist also believe that whale songs might be part of a more complex communication system that has yet to ...

    published: 22 May 2017
  • Top 7 biggest marine reptiles

    Top prehistoric marine reptiles! Top 7 biggest prehistoric marine reptiles that swam in our oceans! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_reptile https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=marine+reptiles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_marine_reptiles https://www.google.pt/#q=marine+reptiles https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHiF... https://www.facebook.com/diogo.nazare.1 https://www.flickr.com/photos/1310836... https://www.instagram.com/diogo_nazar... MARINE REPTILES;MARINE MONSTERS; TOP MARINE REPTILES; TOP 7 MARINE REPTILES; TOP REPTILES; TOP ANCIENT MARINE MONSTERS; TOP ANCIENT SEA BEASTS; SEA MONSTERS Here are some of the biggest and meanest prehistoric marine reptiles that ever inhabit the earth's oceans. From Liopleurodon to the fierce Mosasaur, learn something else fro...

    published: 10 Apr 2016
  • Marine Ocean Alive's Phytoplankton Elements of Life & Sunfood

    http://www.superfoodliving.com/income-opportunity.htmlPhytoplankton obtain energy through a process called photosynthesis and must therefore live in the well-lit surface layer (termed the euphotic zone) of an ocean, sea, lake, or other body of water. Through photosynthesis, phytoplankton are responsible for much of the oxygen present in the Earth's atmosphere half of the total amount produced by all plant life.[2] Their cumulative energy fixation in carbon compounds (primary production) is the basis for the vast majority of oceanic and also many freshwater food webs (chemosynthesis is a notable exception). As a side note, one of the more remarkable food chains in the ocean remarkable because of the small number of links is that of phytoplankton fed on by krill (a type of shrimp) fed on ...

    published: 19 Nov 2008
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ocean 7 marine

ocean 7 marine

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:58
  • Updated: 11 Mar 2007
  • views: 4588
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we build for you to perform
https://wn.com/Ocean_7_Marine
7 Things We Don't Know About the Ocean

7 Things We Don't Know About the Ocean

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:31
  • Updated: 03 Apr 2016
  • views: 3123105
videos
The ocean covers 70% of the planet, but humans still don’t know very much about it. In this episode, Hank discusses seven mysterious ocean topics. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Linnea Boyev, Tomasz Jonarski, Chris Peters, Philippe von Bergen, Will and Sonja Marple, and Mark Terrio-Cameron. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: The Ocean Floor http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/just-how-little-do-we-know-about-the-ocean-floor/ http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/exploration.html http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-27/deep-sea-volcanoes-discovered-in-search-for-mh370/5774122 http://www.nature.com/news/gravity-map-uncovers-sea-floor-surprises-1.16048 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/346/6205/65 https://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/predicted/explore.HTML#sat_alt http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2016/01/14/gravity_map_of_the_ocean_floor_reveals_new_features.html Beneath the Seafloor http://science.sciencemag.org/content/349/6246/420 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/349/6246/376 http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/07/its-going-pluto-and-seeing-mcdonalds http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131208085304.htm Brine Pools http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/02mexico/background/brinepool/brinepool.html http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/artful-amoeba/playing-in-a-deep-sea-brine-pool-is-fun-as-long-as-you-re-an-rov-video/ http://www.nautiluslive.org/blog/2014/07/08/brine-pool-dive-overview http://www.joyeresearchgroup.uga.edu/research/deep-sea-extreme-environments/cold-seeps/brine-seeps/brine-seep-microbial-observatory Milky Seas http://biolum.eemb.ucsb.edu/organism/milkysea.html http://aem.asm.org/content/72/4/2295.full http://www.nrl.navy.mil/content_images/07FA6.pdf http://www.pnas.org/content/102/40/14181.full.pdf http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-05-19/sea-sparkles-put-on-sensational-light-show-in-southern-tasmania/6480996 Unidentified Sounds http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/technology/tools/acoustics/acoustics.html http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-11/29/bloop-mystery-not-solved-sort-of http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/acoustics/ http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/acoustics/sounds/upsweep.html http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/acoustics/sounds/bloop.html The 52Hz Whale http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/acoustics/whales/sounds/sounds_52blue.html http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/21/science/21whal.html?_r=3 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/maybe-worlds-loneliest-whale-isnt-so-isolated-after-all-180955005/?no-ist http://www.slate.com/blogs/wild_things/2014/08/27/_52_blue_the_loneliest_whale_in_the_world.html Abyssal Gigantism http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1012336823275 http://www.zmescience.com/science/biology/deep-sea-giant-creature/ https://universe-review.ca/R10-35-metabolic.htm http://jeb.biologists.org/content/215/12/1995
https://wn.com/7_Things_We_Don't_Know_About_The_Ocean
30 Days Timelapse at Sea | 4K | Through Thunderstorms, Torrential Rain & Busy Traffic

30 Days Timelapse at Sea | 4K | Through Thunderstorms, Torrential Rain & Busy Traffic

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:01
  • Updated: 10 Sep 2017
  • views: 4841369
videos
30 Days of Timelapse, about 80,000 photos combined. 1500GB of Project files. Sailing in the open ocean is a unique feeling and experience.I hope to capture and share it for everyone to see. Route was from Red Sea -- Gulf of Aden -- Indian Ocean -- Colombo -- Malacca Strait -- Singapore -- South East China Sea -- Hong Kong Follow my adventures! Instagram: http://instagram.com/Jeffrey.hk Music: Philip G Anderson - Winter (from 0:00 to 4:37 and 8:00 to 10:00) Buy Winter here: https://philipganderson.bandcamp.com/album/winter Stellardrone - Billions And Billions (from 4:37 to 8:00) Camera used: D750, Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 0:32 Milky Way 0:53 Sirius Star (I think) Correction: Jupiter the planet according to some viewers 1:17 Approaching Port of Colombo 1:45 Cargo Operation 2:08 Departure Colombo with Rainstorm 2:29 Beautiful Sunrise 3:13 Lightning Storm at Malacca Strait and Singapore Strait 3:29 Clear night sky Milky Way with lightning storm 4:01 Camera getting soaked 5:09 Arrival Singapore 5:56 Departure Singapore 6:20 Moon-lit night sky 6:48 Another Sunrise 8:30 Headed due north and you can see Ursa Major rotating neatly around Polaris. 8:36 Squid Boats 8:54 Chaotic Traffic 9:15 Arrival Hong Kong =====10 Reasons Why Maritime is AWESOME ===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U18AHZbS_M =====10 Reasons Why Maritime SUCKS ===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdMYEKwxTyo =====How To Anchor a Mega-Ship ===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62O7KYfb4GA =====Where did I go last 2 months?? Cancun Adventure====== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsizwRUXoa0 =====Navigation Bridge of a Mega Ship===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bj3_peT4u9M =====A Tour of Mega Ship's Engine Room===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7BhBsVigZw =====HEAVY SEAS! Bad Weather in Atlantic Ocean===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZA6gNeZ5G4 =====Cargo Operations on Ship===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kj7ixi2lqF4 =====Top 6 Questions about Merchant Marine===== https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBpQ9Y4jEfg For licensing and usage, contact: licensing@viralhog.com
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A day as a marine biologist PhD student #7 | LAB work and end of the week friends time

A day as a marine biologist PhD student #7 | LAB work and end of the week friends time

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:39
  • Updated: 07 May 2017
  • views: 367
videos
I am a marine biology PhD student. More specifically, I am studying marine pollution in the ocean, and even more specifically I am studying how bacteria interact with plastic pollution in the ocean. Here is how a day in my life looks like. The 7th and the last day of my one week vlog!! ############################################### YOU CAN ALSO FOLLOW ME HERE: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/maria.seandme/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mcMariaSea Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/seandmebyM/
https://wn.com/A_Day_As_A_Marine_Biologist_Phd_Student_7_|_Lab_Work_And_End_Of_The_Week_Friends_Time
Warming oceans and marine species migration: poleward bound

Warming oceans and marine species migration: poleward bound

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:26
  • Updated: 11 Dec 2015
  • views: 9266
videos
The fallout from climate change is often framed as a terrestrial problem, yet global warming is having profound effects on marine life. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
https://wn.com/Warming_Oceans_And_Marine_Species_Migration_Poleward_Bound
Overview | Exploring Oceans

Overview | Exploring Oceans

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:39
  • Updated: 16 Mar 2009
  • views: 207624
videos
The ocean produces 70 percent of the Earth's oxygen and drives our weather and the chemistry of the planet. Most of the creatures on Earth live in the sea. But our knowledge of the ocean is far outstripped by our impact on it. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Overview | Exploring Oceans https://youtu.be/3GRA7ilM708 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
https://wn.com/Overview_|_Exploring_Oceans
BLACK DRAGON - Fine Ocean Marine asphalt/bitumen tanker

BLACK DRAGON - Fine Ocean Marine asphalt/bitumen tanker

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:17
  • Updated: 06 Mar 2016
  • views: 644
videos
The FINE OCEAN MARINE asphalt/bitumen tanker BLACK DRAGON sailed the Kanmon Strait to Ulsan. BLACK DRAGON MMSI: 373901000 IMO: 9652301 Callsign: 3FBS2 Type: ASPHALT/BITUMEN TANKER Size: 80m X 14m GT: 2,106 tons DWT: 2,329 tons Built: 2012 Yard: KURINOURA DOCKYARD & SHIPBUILDING Flag: Panama Fimed date: 2016/02/25 Camera: Panasonic HC-V210M Thanks for watching. Feel free to click like and subscribe. I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (https://www.youtube.com/editor)
https://wn.com/Black_Dragon_Fine_Ocean_Marine_Asphalt_Bitumen_Tanker
Learning with Toys Ep08 Marine Animals in Ocean world (Number & Size Play)

Learning with Toys Ep08 Marine Animals in Ocean world (Number & Size Play)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:45
  • Updated: 03 Jul 2017
  • views: 2683
videos
How many Marine Animals in Ocean World!? Let's counting together! Variety of marine animals are here! Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE!!!
https://wn.com/Learning_With_Toys_Ep08_Marine_Animals_In_Ocean_World_(Number_Size_Play)
Seven Marine 557 Speed Runs

Seven Marine 557 Speed Runs

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:38
  • Updated: 01 May 2013
  • views: 1008247
videos
West Coast Editor Jim Hendricks tests the acceleration and speed of a Midnight Express 39 Open powered by triple Seven Marine 557 outboards.
https://wn.com/Seven_Marine_557_Speed_Runs
Microfibers Polluting the Ocean and Marine Life

Microfibers Polluting the Ocean and Marine Life

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  • Duration: 2:36
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2017
  • views: 871
videos
Tiny plastic fibers from your favorite clothing may be contaminating oceans and marine life. For more Channel One News updates subscribe to Channel One News: https://www.youtube.com/user/ChannelOneNews Visit the Channel One News Website: http://www.channelone.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChannelOneNews/ Twitter: @ChannelOneNews Instagram: @channelonenews Channel One News is the leading news program for young people across the country. Now in its 27th season, the dynamic, daily news show covers domestic and international news stories from a relevant young person’s perspective. Teachers: For daily, supplementary curriculum content tied to each day’s show and access to our video library of more than 2,200 videos, head over to http://www.channelone.com/subscribe/.
https://wn.com/Microfibers_Polluting_The_Ocean_And_Marine_Life
Episode 7: Recreational Diving and Ocean Conservation, Nov. 20, 2014

Episode 7: Recreational Diving and Ocean Conservation, Nov. 20, 2014

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:08:43
  • Updated: 20 Nov 2014
  • views: 1286
videos
You do not have to be a marine scientist to help conserve the oceans. Recreational divers can help protect underwater resources, too. In this episode, diving experts share how recreational divers can contribute to ocean conservation, and they discuss how anyone, in any state, can become certified divers through the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI), which sponsored the episode. The episode features Lisa Rollins from popular The Weather Channel show “Catching Hell,” Sarah Egner, assistant director of MarineLab (www.marinelab.org), and an interview with Amy Slate, owner of Amoray Dive Resort (www.amoray.com).
https://wn.com/Episode_7_Recreational_Diving_And_Ocean_Conservation,_Nov._20,_2014
Episode 7: Green Marine | Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15

Episode 7: Green Marine | Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15

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  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 15 Feb 2013
  • views: 31092
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Rick concludes his European road-trip at Green Marine in Southampton, England. We're given a privileged sneak peek at the full-scale wooden mock-up of the Volvo Ocean 65 which has been built there, in preparation for putting together the real thing for the 2014-15 race. Expect more like this to be uploaded to the Official Volvo Ocean Race YouTube Channel in the future. Get all the latest updates on www.VolvoOceanRace.com
https://wn.com/Episode_7_Green_Marine_|_Volvo_Ocean_Race_2014_15
Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

Most MYSTERIOUS Ocean Facts!

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  • Duration: 11:50
  • Updated: 05 Sep 2016
  • views: 4538721
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Check out these top unexplained mysteries of the deep ocean. From strange sounds captured in the deep sea by hydrophones such as the bloop, the train, and julia, to gigantic whirlpools, biggest underwater falls and the milky bioluminescent sea phenomenon. Are deep sea monsters living deep in the ocean? Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "12 Historical Treasures In The Middle East DESTROYED!" video here: https://youtu.be/Nt9mWUpTp1U Watch our "Most HAUNTED Places In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/h9elrDhft9w Watch our "Most DANGEROUS Religious Cults Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/VTD1qabI3v0 9. Underwater Falls Voted one of the most beautiful places on Earth, Mauritius is an island nation in the Indian Ocean. On the Southwestern tip of the island you will find a fascinating illusion. When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt deposits creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’. But did you know there are actually real underwater waterfalls? Seven waterfalls have been discovered deep underwater. The tallest waterfall on Earth is not Angel Falls, but an underwater waterfall called Denmark Strait Cataract located in the Atlantic ocean between Greenland and Iceland. It is the world's highest underwater waterfall, with water falling almost 11,500 feet and carries 175 million cubic feet of water per second. It is caused due to temperature differences in the water on either side of the strait. Cold water is denser than warm water. And the eastern side of the strait is a lot colder than the western side. So when the waters meet, the cold water sinks below the warmer water, creating a strong downward flow, which is considered a waterfall. And it's not just waterfalls that are under the ocean. There are huge secret rivers, complete with rapids and islands that flow down the sea shelves out into the desert plains creating river banks and flood plains. Here's a picture of the river Cenote Angelita under the sea of Mexico. These salty rivers carry sediments and minerals and could be vital in sustaining life. The world's sixth largest river, by volume, is below the Black Sea. It is 350 times larger than the Thames and 150 feet deep in places. 8. Milky Sea Phenomenon For over 400 years, sailors told tales of a mysterious event that takes place far out in the Indian Ocean. They would come across miles and miles of milky glowing waters, sometimes stretching as far as the eye could see. In 2005, a group of scientists led by Dr. Steven Miller of the Naval Research Laboratory in Monterey, Calif., decided to take a closer look at this story to see if it was true. They managed to register about 235 observations and get a satellite image that showed an area of low lighting in the Indian Ocean about the size of Connecticut. Their samples that they collected indicated the presence of a type of bioluminescent bacteria in the water, known as Vibrio harveyi. This isn't the same kind of bacteria that you might see in waves that use their bright light to ward off predators. This bioluminescent bacteria may actually use light to attract fish, since its favorite place to live is inside a fish's gut. Scientists' guess is that since they only emit a very faint light on their own, they have to gather together to make an impact. Their collective glow can grow to massive, milky sea proportions when their numbers swell to a huge amount -- think 40 billion trillion. They may also congregate to colonize algae. Sounds like a party! It is still only a guess since Dr. Miller and his colleagues haven't determined exactly what causes the bacteria to gather. 7. Unexplained sounds Of course dark, creepy fog can make you jump at anything that goes bump in the night. But what about things that go "bloop" in the sea? With names like "The Bloop," "Train" and "Julia," the sounds have been captured by hydrophones, or underwater microphones, monitored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The decidedly nonspooky nicknames for these sounds do little to dispel the mystery surrounding them. In 1997, NOAA hydrophones 3,000 miles apart picked up one of the loudest sounds ever recorded off the southern coast of South America: the Bloop (which sounds exactly like its name, a bloop). The Bloop mimics marine animal sounds in some ways, but if it were some kind of sea creature it would have to be almost the size of the Eiffel tower for that sound to be heard from 3,000 miles away. So what made the sound? It's anyone's guess but deep-sea monsters aside, NOAA holds the most likely explanation for The Bloop is that it was the sound of a large iceberg fracturing. Sure.... Another weird noise known as Julia sounds almost like someone whining or maybe even singing under water. The eastern equatorial Pacific autonomous array (the fancy name for the network of hydrophones) picked up this strange sound that lasted 15 seconds in 1999.
https://wn.com/Most_Mysterious_Ocean_Facts
What is MARINE GEOLOGY? What does MARINE GEOLOGY mean? MARINE GEOLOGY meaning & explanation

What is MARINE GEOLOGY? What does MARINE GEOLOGY mean? MARINE GEOLOGY meaning & explanation

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  • Duration: 2:39
  • Updated: 03 Jan 2017
  • views: 507
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What is MARINE GEOLOGY? What does MARINE GEOLOGY mean? MARINE GEOLOGY meaning - MARINE GEOLOGY definition - MARINE GEOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Marine geology or geological oceanography is the study of the history and structure of the ocean floor. It involves geophysical, geochemical, sedimentological and paleontological investigations of the ocean floor and coastal zone. Marine geology has strong ties to physical oceanography. Marine geological studies were of extreme importance in providing the critical evidence for sea floor spreading and plate tectonics in the years following World War II. The deep ocean floor is the last essentially unexplored frontier and detailed mapping in support of both military (submarine) objectives and economic (petroleum and metal mining) objectives drives the research. The Ring of Fire around the Pacific Ocean with its attendant intense volcanism and seismic activity poses a major threat for disastrous earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. Any early warning systems for these disastrous events will require a more detailed understanding of marine geology of coastal and island arc environments. The study of littoral and deep sea sedimentation and the precipitation and dissolution rates of calcium carbonate in various marine environments has important implications for global climate change. The discovery and continued study of mid-ocean rift zone volcanism and hydrothermal vents, first in the Red Sea and later along the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge systems were and continue to be important areas of marine geological research. The extremophile organisms discovered living within and adjacent to those hydrothermal systems have had a pronounced impact on our understanding of life on Earth and potentially the origin of life within such an environment. Oceanic trenches are hemispheric-scale long but narrow topographic depressions of the sea floor. They also are the deepest parts of the ocean floor. The Mariana Trench (or Marianas Trench) is the deepest known submarine trench, and the deepest location in the Earth's crust itself. A subduction zone where the Pacific Plate is being subducted under the Philippine Sea Plate. The bottom of the trench is further below sea level than Mount Everest is above sea level.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Marine_Geology_What_Does_Marine_Geology_Mean_Marine_Geology_Meaning_Explanation
Marine Debris & Ocean Currents

Marine Debris & Ocean Currents

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  • Duration: 4:28
  • Updated: 31 Aug 2017
  • views: 4299
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Click here to subscribe ► http://bit.ly/2dPZNN2 Cool: Ocean currents Not Cool: Trash swirling around in ocean currents Many people don't realize that ocean currents not only transport fish, nutrients, heat and other important natural phenomena around the planet, but they also circulate our trash! Yep, that water bottle that fell out of your boat when you capsized could be halfway to Tahiti by now! Understanding how currents work, including how to measure them using drifters, allows scientists to better predict ocean circulation. Here we outline a simple experiment you can do to measure the currents at your home. To learn more about US Sailing's Reach Initiative, STEM & environmental education through sailing, check out reach.ussailing.org
https://wn.com/Marine_Debris_Ocean_Currents
marine zone in hong kong ocean park part 7

marine zone in hong kong ocean park part 7

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  • Duration: 0:45
  • Updated: 05 Aug 2011
  • views: 11
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marine zone in hong kong ocean park part 7
https://wn.com/Marine_Zone_In_Hong_Kong_Ocean_Park_Part_7
Amazing Underwater Marine Life

Amazing Underwater Marine Life

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  • Duration: 5:09
  • Updated: 06 Feb 2014
  • views: 488688
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Amazing Underwater Marine Life Enjoy this relaxing underwater video from the philippines. Most of the time the ocean appears to be blue because this is the color our eyes see. But the ocean can be many other colors depending upon particles in the water, the depth of the water, and the amount of skylight. The colors we see depend upon the reflection of the visible wavelengths of light to our eyes. Wavelengths of light pass through matter differently depending on the material's composition. Blue wavelengths are transmitted to greater depths of the ocean, while red wavelengths are absorbed quickly. Water molecules scatter blue wavelengths by absorbing the light waves, and then rapidly reemitting the light waves in different directions. That is why there are mostly blue wavelengths that are reflected back to our eyes. Sometimes oceans look green. This may be because there is an abundance of plant life or sediment from rivers that flow into the ocean. The blue light is absorbed more and the yellow pigments from plants mix with the blue light waves to produce the color green. Sometimes parts of the oceans will look milky brown after a storm passes. This is because winds and currents associated with the storm churn up sand and sediment from the rivers that lead into the oceans. The ocean may also reflect the blue sky. However this is prominent only at relatively low angles and when the water is smooth. Apart from the blue ocean color the most interesting thing in the ocean are the marine animals living in this habitat. Also their color is without light that bright as we see it in underwater photographs or underwater DVD Videos. This film was filmed with dive lights mounted on a underwater video camera and shows spectacular colors of the ocean inhabitants the graceful marine creatures.
https://wn.com/Amazing_Underwater_Marine_Life
Top 10  CREEPY DEEP SEA Creatures Recently Discovered

Top 10 CREEPY DEEP SEA Creatures Recently Discovered

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  • Duration: 7:57
  • Updated: 23 May 2016
  • views: 1417258
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Welcome to Top10Archive! The deep blue sea… Often said to be Earth’s last great frontier, an estimated 85% of the world’s ocean remains undiscovered. That of course means we’re bound to stumble upon new species and incredible discoveries. These 10 findings of the past two years are just a small sampling of what’s really out there, waiting our prying eyes and acquiring minds. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Unknown Sea Cucumber 9. New Species of Ctenophore 8. Sunburst 7. Narrow-head Catshark 6. Dusky Snout Catshark 5. Mariana Trench Jellyfish 4. Hunchback Anglerfish 3. Ninja Lanternshark 2. Xenoturbella churro 1. Ghost Octopus Voice Over Talent: https://www.youtube.com/user/thought2
https://wn.com/Top_10_Creepy_Deep_Sea_Creatures_Recently_Discovered
Ocean's Alive Marine Phytoplankton For EPA & DHA

Ocean's Alive Marine Phytoplankton For EPA & DHA

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  • Duration: 7:15
  • Updated: 01 Feb 2016
  • views: 7128
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Yep! It's impossible to find Ocean’s Alive Marine Phytoplankton at this pricing these days! It's estimated that 90% of Americans are deficient in Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and what's alarming about this is that 60% of the human brain is made up of these valuable fatty esters. I was listening to Dr. Jack Kruse, an expert on Omega fats and he stated that to really absorb any significant amount of EPA and DHA from a food, it must come from a "live" source or it quickly becomes rancid and is not readily absorbable. This is one of the reasons he frowns upon a vegan diet and is a huge advocate of eating specific fish and other sea animals, which contain EPA and DHA. However, for the Ocean's Alive Marine Phytoplankton, they take freshly harvested, raw marine phytoplankton from contained labs in Spain and simply suspend it in a pure, concentrated sea mineral solution for you to consume. I am curious whether, if this was explained to Dr. Jack Kruse, he would consider this product a "live" vegan source of bio-available EPA and DHA? What Angela and I love about Oceans Alive Marine Phytoplankton is that we can literally just put it into a glass of water and it's like getting a green juice without having to make juice! Also the taste is very comforting to me, like mothers' milk or something. (I have no idea what mothers' milk actually tastes like, lol, but this product is very comforting to me when I drink it.) I like to use Marine Phytoplankton when I'm on the go and don't have time to make a vegetable juice, as you can see in the video further below. You can also find out in that video why Angela likes to take Phytoplankton every single morning! Normally $39 each, if you get 3 bottles of Ocean's Alive Marine Phytoplankton now and use the coupon code rawfood7 during checkout, you will get each bottle for just $19.59! If you only want one bottle, the price will be $21.76! This offer is good until next Sunday night at midnight Pacific time, or while supplies last. We also have Omegazen + EPA at Blow0ut pricing too. Omega-3 Fatty Acids are composed of ALA, EPA and DHA. ALA is very easy to get as it's available in many standard oils we consume such as Hempseed Oil, Chia Oil, Sacha Inchi Oil, etc. The issue is the EPA and DHA, for which 90% of Americans apparently have deficiencies. Granted, ALA does get naturally converted into EPA within the body and EPA can naturally convert to DHA. However, each of these conversions requires extra metabolic work and some people who have allergies or other health challenges such as diabetes have a rough time performing these conversions. This is why doctors generally recommend for people to take fish oil two times a week, to make sure they're receiving DHA and EPA directly, instead of relying on the conversion from ALA. However, fish don't produce DHA and EPA on their own. They get it from algaes they consume. This Omegazen + EPA product that we are blowing out today, is the algae that the fish consume! We are simply bypassing the fish and going directly to the algae source! I just now lowered the price of the Omegazen + EPA, so you can get it at about half price - $15.04 per bottle if you get three and use the coupon code rawfood7, or $16.68 if you just get one bottle! If you are interested in ordering these Omega-3 boosting products at the lowest pricing ever seen on the internet, click the link below: http://www.therawfoodworld.com/ Subscribe for new weekly videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRawFoodWorld?sub_confirmation=1 Watch Matt LIVE on Tuesday's @ 8:00 PM EST and #AskMattMonarch anything here: http://news.therawfoodworld.com/live/ MORE VIDEOS: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRawFoodWorld THE RAW FOOD WORLD STORE: http://www.therawfoodworld.com/ POSITIVE NEWS: http://news.therawfoodworld.com/ TV SHOW: http://news.therawfoodworld.com/raw-food-world-tv-show/ FOLLOW MATT MONARCH and THE RAW FOOD WORLD: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/RawFoodWorld Twitter - https://twitter.com/MattMonarch Instagram - http://instagram.com/therawfoodworld Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/therawfoodworld/ Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+TheRawFoodWorldtrfw/posts LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/pub/matt-monarch/7/a96/4b1 MySpace - https://myspace.com/mattmonarch SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/therawfoodworld iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/live-hangouts-matt-monarch/id979085810
https://wn.com/Ocean's_Alive_Marine_Phytoplankton_For_Epa_Dha
Predator X - Most powerful marine reptile ever - Planet Dinosaur - BBC

Predator X - Most powerful marine reptile ever - Planet Dinosaur - BBC

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  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2013
  • views: 2639523
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In 2006, a fossil was dug out of a frozen island high in the Arctic. It was a colossal marine reptile, twice as big as most ocean predators, at 15 metres long and weighing about 45 tonnes. This was Predator X, the most powerful marine reptile ever discovered. Its skull alone was nearly twice the size of a tyrannosaurus rex's, and its bite force unmatched by anything in the Jurassic seas. Narrated by John Hurt Planet Dinosaur tells the stories of the biggest, deadliest and weirdest creatures ever to walk the Earth, using the latest fossil evidence and immersive computer graphics. Subscribe to BBC Earth: http://bit.ly/ydxvrP Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth (ex-UK only) BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth BBC Earth YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCEarth Latest BBC Earth videos: http://bit.ly/y1wtbi
https://wn.com/Predator_X_Most_Powerful_Marine_Reptile_Ever_Planet_Dinosaur_BBC
14 Ocean's Deadliest Creatures

14 Ocean's Deadliest Creatures

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  • Duration: 7:51
  • Updated: 05 Oct 2016
  • views: 8022232
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Here are the top 14 dangerous and some even poisonous creatures in the ocean it's terrifying to think they are under there waiting!! 7. Megalodon Megalodon is an extinct species of shark that lived millions of years ago. They were a lot like the great white sharks of today only much bigger. While great whites can reach a length of 20 feet, Megalodon’s could reportedly reach a ridiculous length of nearly 60 feet. Their teeth have been found across the globe from Australia to Japan and as far north as England and Denmark. 6. Killer Whales Being an apex predator means you have no natural predators. Essentially these are the animals at the top of the food chain. Killer, or Orca, whales are considered apex predators and have been known to kill great white sharks, leopard seals, and even other whales. Like wolves, they have a tendency to hunt in packs. Wild orcas don't pose any threat to humans, but there have been incidents in which captive orcas have killed or seriously injured their handlers at marine theme parks. These events highlight the fact that people should probably stop keeping killer whales in captivity rather than any indication that orcas are potentially dangerous to humans. 5. Stingrays Stingrays are usually very passive and gentle around human beings. But if they feel vulnerable in any way they have barbed stingers on their tails that inflict notoriously painful stings that can be deadly when hit in the chest or abdomen. Since stingrays spend a lot of time camouflaging on the seafloor humans often step on them accidentally and end up with a very sore foot to show for it. The world just recognized the ten year anniversary of popular wildlife expert Steve Irwin’s death, who was fatally stung by a stingray on September 4, 2006. 4. Leopard Seal Most seals are relatively harmless and pose no threat to human beings. Leopard seals, however, are not your average run of the mill seal. They are the only seals that eat warm-blooded prey, and the females are larger than the males, another oddity amongst seals. They eat penguins, smaller seals and squid using their powerful jaws, sharp teeth, and clever hunting tactics. In 2003 a British marine biologist was fatally attacked by a leopard seal while snorkeling off of the Antarctic Peninsula. It was the first time a fatal seal attack was recorded, and though seal attacks are rare scientists speculate that the more humans interact with these seals, the more attacks there will be in the future. 3. Box Jellyfish Amongst the world’s most poisonous creatures, this unassuming ocean dweller is responsible for many fatalities annually. Many countries don’t require death certificates, so the exact number isn’t known, but judging from the fact that 20 to 40 people die every year in the Philippines alone, it’s safe to assume that box jellyfish are one of the ocean’s deadliest creatures. Their tentacles are covered with cnidocyst, which contains a tiny dart loaded with a poison that can cause a rapid spike in blood pressure leading to a potentially fatal heart attack. These facts have led some to call the box jellyfish the world’s most venomous creature. 2. Sharks When talking about the ocean’s deadliest predators, sharks are usually the first creatures to come to people’s minds. Though their reputation does have some basis in reality, it is cultural references like the Jaws movie franchise and the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week that have ballooned the shark’s reputation to all new somewhat undeserving heights. There are around 500 species of sharks, but only three, the great white, tiger and bull sharks are responsible for double-digit fatalities. From 1948 to early 2016 there were 2,899 total unprovoked shark attacks recorded around the world, 548 of which were fatal. In comparison, you are more likely to be killed by a falling aircraft or riding a horse. 1. Saltwater Crocodile The saltwater crocodile has two things going for it that help to make them the ocean’s deadliest. These beasts are the largest reptiles on the planet, reaching weights of up to 2,600 pounds and have the most powerful bite on earth, ten times stronger than that of the great white shark. Of all crocodiles, this territorial species is the most likely to treat humans as prey. There are a few fatal saltwater crocodile attacks per year in Australia, with many more attacks from different areas of the world that are believed to go unreported.
https://wn.com/14_Ocean's_Deadliest_Creatures
7 of the Smartest Sea Creatures

7 of the Smartest Sea Creatures

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  • Duration: 11:07
  • Updated: 22 May 2017
  • views: 2706
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7 of the Smartest Sea Creatures! There are a lot intelligent animals in the ocean. But here are the most genius ones, like the dolphin or octopus. Subscribe for the latest videos: https://goo.gl/7xzjzR 7: Whales Sperm whales, which are the largest of the toothed-whale species, have the largest brains in the animal kingdom, weighing, on average, 17 pounds. Although the mere size of the brain is not necessarily an indication of intelligence, scientists have discovered that sperm whales, such as the humpback whale or beluga whales, have spindle cells in their brains. These cells are only found in species believed to have higher intelligence, such as elephants, great apes, & humans. Scientist also believe that whale songs might be part of a more complex communication system that has yet to be fully understood. 6: Sea Otter The sea otter is a marine mammal & is the heaviest member of the weasel family. Unlike other sea mammals, their main form of insulation is a coat of fur that is very thick &the densest in the animal kingdom. Even though it is able to walk on land, the sea otter spends the vast majority of its time in the sea. In fact it is believed that these animals can live their entire lives without ever leaving the water. A significant example of a sea otter’s intelligence is it’s ability to use tools. A sea otter will often use rocks as hammers to break apart shellfish for food. Otter pups raised in captivity exhibit a rudimentary inclination towards tools use, without ever having received training. 5: Orcas Orcas, are toothed whales & the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family. In some instances they have been known to attack other adult whales. They are apex predators meaning that no other creature preys upon them. The orca has the second-heaviest brain among all marine animals & has frequently been described as intelligent. People that have interacted with these animals have constantly offered examples of their playfulness, curiosity & problem solving abilities. According to the fishermen, they figured out the decoys in less than an hour, & solved the problem by splitting into groups. 4: Cuttlefish Like octopuses or squids, cuttlefish are capable of releasing ink from an ink sac whenever they are threatened by predators. They are also characterized by a unique internal shell called the cuttlebone which is used for buoyancy. Historically, jewelers have used the cuttlebone to make casts for various pieces. Their brain-to-body ratio is among the largest from all invertebrates. Cuttlefish are capable of communicating visually in a very fast & diverse manner. The common cuttlefish is capable of displaying 34 chromatic, eight postural, six locomotor & six textural elements which constitute a form of visual language. They are also referred to as the ‘chameleons of the sea’. 3: The California Sea Lion California Sea Lions communicate through a series of vocalizations known as barks. Mothers communicate with their pups through contact calls. These sea lions are particularly intelligent, so much that they may be trained to perform certain tasks. If accustomed to human presence, they display almost no fear & that is why they are a common choice for public display in circuses, zoos, & oceanariums. The United States Navy has even trained these animals to perform particular military operations. A sea lion named ‘Ronan’ was recorded moving it’s head in synchronization to musical rhythms. Another sea lion named ‘Rio’ showed evidence of great memory. 2: Octopuses Octopus are believed to be the most intelligent & behaviorally diverse invertebrate. Marine wildlife experts have identified over 300 species of them, which accounts for more than one-third of the total number of cephalopod species. Octopuses do not have internal or external skeletons, thus allowing them to squeeze through tight spaces. When threatened by predators they defend themselves by hiding, jetting quickly through the water, using camouflage, and/or through the expulsion of ink. Octopus species can be trained to distinguish between various patterns & shapes. Some researchers have claimed that they practice observational learning. 1: Bottlenose Dolphins The Bottlenose dolphin is the most common & well-known member of the Delphinidae family. They are also considered to be among the most intelligent animals in the world. They communicate through whistles, burst pulse sounds & body language. Body language communication movements include slapping the tail on the surface, butting heads, snapping jaws & leaping out of the water. These dolphins have the second-largest brain to body mass ratio, surpassed only by humans. The investigated cognitive abilities include mental representations, sensory skills & concept formation.
https://wn.com/7_Of_The_Smartest_Sea_Creatures
Top 7 biggest marine reptiles

Top 7 biggest marine reptiles

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  • Duration: 4:27
  • Updated: 10 Apr 2016
  • views: 6900
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Top prehistoric marine reptiles! Top 7 biggest prehistoric marine reptiles that swam in our oceans! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_reptile https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=marine+reptiles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_marine_reptiles https://www.google.pt/#q=marine+reptiles https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHiF... https://www.facebook.com/diogo.nazare.1 https://www.flickr.com/photos/1310836... https://www.instagram.com/diogo_nazar... MARINE REPTILES;MARINE MONSTERS; TOP MARINE REPTILES; TOP 7 MARINE REPTILES; TOP REPTILES; TOP ANCIENT MARINE MONSTERS; TOP ANCIENT SEA BEASTS; SEA MONSTERS Here are some of the biggest and meanest prehistoric marine reptiles that ever inhabit the earth's oceans. From Liopleurodon to the fierce Mosasaur, learn something else from this great marine beasts! Liopleurodon (/ˌlaɪ.ɵˈplʊərədɒn/; meaning 'smooth-sided teeth') is a genus of large, carnivorous marine reptile belonging to the Pliosauroidea, a clade of short-necked plesiosaurs. The two species of Liopleurodon lived during the Callovian stage of the Middle Jurassic Period (c. 160 to 155 mya). It was the apex predator of the Middle to Late Jurassic seas that covered Europe. The largest species, L. ferox, is estimated to have grown up to 6.39 meters (21.0 feet) in length. The name "Liopleurodon" (meaning "smooth-sided tooth") derives from Ancient Greek words: λεῖος [leios], "smooth"; pleurá, side or rib; and odṓn, tooth. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liopleu... Tanystropheus (Greek τανυς “long” + στροφαηυς “vertebra”), was a 6 metre (20 ft) long reptile that dated from the Middle Triassic period. It is recognizable by its extremely elongated neck, which measured 3 metres (10 ft) long - longer than its body and tail combined. The neck was composed of 12–13 extremely elongate vertebrae. Fossils have been found in Europe, the Middle East and China. Complete skeletons of juvenile individuals are most abundant in the Besano Formation of Italy, dating to 232 million years ago during the middle Triassic period (Ladinian stage). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanystr... Thalattoarchon is an extinct genus of ichthyosaur from the Middle Triassic of the western United States. The type species Thalattoarchon saurophagis (meaning "lizard-eating sovereign of the sea" in Greek) was discovered in Nevada in 2010 and formally described in 2013. It is known from a single skeleton, holotype FMNH PR 3032, consisting of a partial skull, vertebral column, hip bones, and parts of the hind fins. The total length of Thalattoarchon is estimated to have been at least 8.6 metres (28 ft). Thalattoarchon is thought to have been one of the first marine macropredators capable of eating prey that was similar in size to itself, an ecological role that can be compared to that of modern orcas. Thalattoarchon lived four million years after the first appearance of ichthyosaurs in the Early Triassic and is therefore the oldest known marine reptile to have been an apex predator. It lived eight million years after the Permian-Triassic extinction event, indicating a fast recovery of marine ecosystems after the mass extinction. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalatt... Thalassomedon is a genus of plesiosaur, named by Welles in 1943. Greek, thalassa, "sea" and Greek, medon, "lord, ruler": Sea lord. This genus of plesiosaur occurred in North America about 95 mya. It occurs in the Cenomanian strata of the Late Cretaceous rock. Its closest relative is the Elasmosaurus and together they make up the family Elasmosauridae. There are six specimens of varying state of preservation on display at various U.S. museums. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalass... Mosasaurus (/ˌmoʊzəˈsɔrəs/; "lizard of the Meuse River") is a genus of mosasaur, extinct carnivorous aquatic lizards. It existed during the Maastrichtian age of the late Cretaceous period, between about 70 and 66 million years ago, in western Europe and North America. The name means "Meuse lizard", as the first specimen was found near the Meuse River (Latin Mosa + Greek sauros lizard). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosasaurus Shonisaurus is a genus of ichthyosaur. At least 37 incomplete fossil specimens of the marine reptile have been found in the Luning Formation of Nevada, USA. This formation dates to the late Carnian age of the late Triassic period, about 215 million years ago. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shonisa... Shastasaurus ("Mt. Shasta lizard") is an extinct genus of ichthyosaur from the middle and late Triassic, and is the largest marine reptile that has yet been found. Specimens have been reported from the United States, Canada, and China. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shastas... Marine reptiles Marine reptiles Marine reptiles Marine reptiles
https://wn.com/Top_7_Biggest_Marine_Reptiles
Marine Ocean Alive's Phytoplankton Elements of Life & Sunfood

Marine Ocean Alive's Phytoplankton Elements of Life & Sunfood

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  • Updated: 19 Nov 2008
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http://www.superfoodliving.com/income-opportunity.htmlPhytoplankton obtain energy through a process called photosynthesis and must therefore live in the well-lit surface layer (termed the euphotic zone) of an ocean, sea, lake, or other body of water. Through photosynthesis, phytoplankton are responsible for much of the oxygen present in the Earth's atmosphere half of the total amount produced by all plant life.[2] Their cumulative energy fixation in carbon compounds (primary production) is the basis for the vast majority of oceanic and also many freshwater food webs (chemosynthesis is a notable exception). As a side note, one of the more remarkable food chains in the ocean remarkable because of the small number of links is that of phytoplankton fed on by krill (a type of shrimp) fed on by baleen whales. Phytoplankton are also crucially dependent on minerals. These are primarily macronutrients such as nitrate, phosphate or silicic acid, whose availability is governed by the balance between the so-called biological pump and upwelling of deep, nutrient-rich waters. However, across large regions of the World Ocean such as the Southern Ocean, phytoplankton are also limited by the lack of the micronutrient iron. This has led to some scientists advocating iron fertilization as a means to counteract the accumulation of human-produced carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere[3]. While almost all phytoplankton species are obligate photoautotrophs, there are some that are mixotrophic and other, non-pigmented species that are actually heterotrophic (the latter are often viewed as zooplankton). Of these, the best known are dinoflagellate genera such as Noctiluca and Dinophysis, that obtain organic carbon by ingesting other organisms or detrital material. Diatoms Dinoflagellate The term phytoplankton encompasses all photoautotrophic microorganisms in aquatic food webs. Phytoplankton serve as the base of the aquatic food web, providing an essential ecological function for all aquatic life. However, unlike terrestrial communities, where most autotrophs are plants, phytoplankton are a diverse group, incorporating protistan eukaryotes and both eubacterial and archaebacterial prokaryotes. There are about 5,000 species of marine phytoplankton.[4] There is uncertainty in how such diversity has evolved in an environment where competition for only a few resources would suggest limited potential for niche differentiation.[5] In terms of numbers, the most important groups of phytoplankton include the diatoms, cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates, although many other groups of algae are represented. One group, the coccolithophorids, is responsible (in part) for the release of significant amounts of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) into the atmosphere. DMS is converted to sulfate and these sulfate molecules act as cloud condensation nuclei, increasing general cloud cover. In oligotrophic oceanic regions such as the Sargasso Sea or the South Pacific gyre, phytoplankton is dominated by the small sized cells, called picoplankton, mostly composed of cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus) and picoeucaryotes such as Micromonas.
https://wn.com/Marine_Ocean_Alive's_Phytoplankton_Elements_Of_Life_Sunfood